Archive for the ‘language’ Category

Normian Language? Which One?

March 22, 2018

In my youth my friend helped me draw up outlines of several languages for our science fiction universe (here called the Koplushian Alliance.) (He helped me a lot, actually.)

I’m not much of a linguist.  I don’t pretend to be.  I don’t play one on television or radio.  I also don’t know all the techie terms about things like cases, genders, modes, etc. What I do is to have fun with language creating.

So the planet Norm is where the Koplushians are from, and when they first escaped the oppression on their home world they spoke what we originally developed as Old Koplushian.  Old Kop was developed initially as a completely separate language with very little or nothing in common with modern Koplushian. As it turns out, this doesn’t really work.  When the Koplushians left they likely spoke a hodge podge of several languages, so I’ve ret-conned Old Koplushian as what was then called Mornerthian. I still call it Old Koplushian though.

On Norm there were three super powers, the republics of Mornerth and Defyoo, and the Dizhen Empire.  So Old Koplushian is now Mornerthian (Mornerthiset) and I’ve continued to develop it using mostly roots from Koplushian.  Some of the words differ because…

The language we previously called Old Koplushian, I took and made into a separate language called Defyooan (Defyanth).  Some of its roots have survived into Old Koplushian, but I treat it as a separate, almost archaic language.

Normian, which I have renamed Dizheth, was always separate and I have kept it so.  Dizheth is fun because it was the product of an oppressive society, thus I can put in all kinds of non-PC items, like the word for ‘woman’ and ‘wife’ resembling the word for property and ‘beautiful’ resembling ‘ripe’. I figure Dizheth is still fairly irregular because it hasn’t had any willing changes or simplifications from imigration or such. The powers that be on that planet probably keep the status quo pretty well.

Koplushian and Mornerthian are a very egalitarian languages, but Modern Koplushian contains a few artifacts from its past such as formal/informal cases on some of its plurals (much like the difference between ‘greetings’ and just ‘hello’.)

So really there is no one Normian language.  I’m sure in reality there are at least dozens, though how many have survived to modern times no one knows.

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Pandla Basics 1 – Phrases

March 12, 2018

vritian empireI’ve just  put up the second TinyCards deck for Pandla. This one has some phrases in it.  The deck is here. [link]

I’d like to mention something about the pronunciation here.  The vowels are the pure ‘operatic’ vowels, like in Esperanto, but there are a few exceptions like ‘ou’ sounding like ‘ow’. Each vowel is sounded as well, so a word like ‘kaele’ is pronounced kah-eh-leh, not, for example, kayleh.  Any preceeding ‘m’ is usually prounounced alone, not blended, so ‘mkui’ is spoken as M-koo-ee.

Soon I’ll probably create a deck of short phrases like hello and good-bye.  Later I may start translating what Mugbie Elo said in my short story Terra Incognita.  He was likely speaking Koplushian at the time, but, well…

 

Pandla, the language of the Vritian Empire

March 7, 2018
vritian empire

Logo I created for the TinyCards deck. The twin-arm galaxy swirl is the Vritians reminder that they once ‘owned’ the entire galaxy while the green hexagon shows their place among the six ‘human planets’ and the Koplushian Alliance.

Lately I’ve been in the mood to develop another one of the languages one might meet in the Koplushian Alliance. This one belongs to the group of humans who, according to them, once spanned the Milky Way galaxy from arm to arm.  I’ve got the basic grammar worked out, but I’m also adding in some inconsistancies along the way.  The Vritian Empire was around for thousands of years before it fell into ruin due to their dependance on robot ‘servitors’. When my friend Jim introduced the idea for their past into our universe, it was partly to give a reason why there were so many ‘human variants’ in the galaxy. I always felt this was a good idea.  Jim is also the one who suggested that I base the Vritian language on a combination of Swahili and Latin.  This simply means that I put samplings of those languages into his ‘word generator’ and multisyllabic re-hashings got spit out for me to either use, reject, or alter to my liking.

So I’ve created some TinyCard decks of some Vritian words and a few sentences here: [link]. More will follow with time.  In the meantime, here are a few simple sentences that I translated to help nail down some of the grammar.

A tree is tall – berum kama kuwa.

The green tree fell – uwo mbita berum hapani.

The tall tree fell quickly – uwo kuwa berum nomenzi hapani.

I see a tree – siga indus berum.

Do you see the green tree? – kanom uwo mbita berum indus?

Look at the tree! – induswa uwo berum!

The two trees were green. – uwo dum berum kwi mbita.

The tree will fall. – uwo berum hapanba.

I am not a tree. – siga apum kama berum.

You gave food to me – kanom mwovi sinewo siga

Do you speak Pandla/Vritian? –  kanom pandla dagarmengwe?

I am a little and yellow bird. – Siga kama iako vasa kwei ulako.

Koplushian Language, Etc.

February 25, 2018

kop

I recently decided to ressurect a language project that I first created about 35 years ago. It’s the Koplushian language.  I feel the need to work on it because it influenced some aspects of he Breehah language, especially where high technology comes into play. GThe problem is that over time my tweakings of Koplushian have altered the language to the point where some older texts may not be legible.  Hmm. Talk about real world philology in conlangs. Don’t worry, I’ll figure it out.

Breehah glyphs and numerals

February 10, 2018

I’ve finally designed the letters and numerals of the breehah language. In the image below you can see that I’ve also given the letters names. In writing the words of the language these letters also act as syllables. So like our texting abbreviations, they don’t write the vowel after the letter if the name of the letter already has that vowel, much like the we write ‘OK’ instead of ‘okay’.

I’ll make a TinyCard deck for those who would like to learn this alphabet. It’s all fun. Hais horpe breehah horgah?

 

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Learn Breehah Culture: hi’JOsi

June 17, 2017

Josi

josi native of SilonarThe josi is a ‘Chicken’-like reptilian animal, domesticated for the eggs it produces.It has been bred into subspecies that can thrive in almost any climate on the planet Silonar. Aside from their eggs, josis are best known for the loud screech they make while laying eggs.

rEEKi!, [urEEki!] the sound a josi makes.

A josi joke in breehah and English:

TOku TOku
knock knock

BOke nos?
Who is it?

BOOlah JOsi
Rude Chicken-like creature

BOOlah JO…
Rude chick…

rEEki!

Learn Breehah Culture: hi’MeTAH

June 14, 2017
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Got Milk?

The metah shown above is a native Silonarian animal, very important to their way of life. It is a source of milk (jetai), meat (legr), wool (geme), and hide (fahree), not to mention fertilizer (sahlumo.)  Given the importance of this animal in traditional breehah life, it is possibly related to metoo, the breehah word for ‘live’.

The picture above is a humorous breehah take on the popular ‘Got Milk’ campaign here on Earth. It also demonstrates what I call the ‘question’ tense of the verb, the ‘s’ on ‘hois‘.

Adjectives in Breehah

May 29, 2017

Lesson 4
haiTAHke FOmidi

Adjectives
dihorjibe

Adjectives in breehah are a bit irregular. Most of the time the adjective is suffixed to the noun they describe. However, sometimes they are kept separate and follow the noun. This is typical in sentences that mere state the noun is X. In rare cases they preceed the noun they modify. And sometimes they are prefixed to the noun. This is usually in established compound words and  mainly due to conventions being established over time and being carried over to the modern language. (more…)

A Prayer in Breehah

May 13, 2017

In the Holy Bible, in the Gospel of Matthew, chapter 6: verses 9–13 are known as The Lord’s Prayer, or the Our Father or the Pater Noster. My pastor once noted that there is nothing in the Lord’s prayer that precludes anyone of any faith from using it in their prayer life.  For that reason I decided to translate it into Breehah to see how it goes.  It was an interesting exercise. I’ve placed it below and given a breakdown of the translation below that. I’ve also made a Tiny Cards deck [link] to help you if you felt like you wanted to try and memorize it. Also, if you look on the introduction page for the Breehah language [link], you will see that I’ve put up links to a Breehah-English dictionary as well as one for English to Breehah.  The dictionary pages are a work in progress, but you might enjoy looking through them. (more…)

The Eruithairkan Language

May 5, 2017

Below is some information which survived the demise of the much lamented Koplushia wiki website that mysteriously evaporated some years ago. I made this language up in a whim at the time, but thought you might like a delightful break from studying breehah.

There will not be a Tiny Cards deck for this one. If you want to know what this language in reference to, look up my short story ‘Terra Incognita,’ available in English [link] or Esperanto! [link]

The Eruithairkan language is ‘spoken’ while inhaling through the mouth and putting one’s toungue in certain places in your mouth. The skilled linguist just might be able to duplicate the sounds the Eruithairkans make, but you really neeed to be immersed with the Eruithairk to get it right. Being as that’s quite unlikely, this remains a fun exercise for anyone interested.


eruithairkan

An Eruithairkan musician

I have used letters of the Latin alphabet to indicate the different positions of the tongue.  Some sounds of the Eruithairkan language are made by exhaling and these are also indicated.

The Sounds

Remember to inhale when following these, with the lips parted.

F – indicates the tongue  forward in the mouth, just touching behind the top teeth.

M – indicates the tongue pulled back from F, the front part of the tongue, but not the tip is on the pallate.

B – indicates the tongue is pulled back further than M, at this point the lower edges of the toungue may flap.  This is the desired effect.

R – indicates the F position with the right side of the mouth opened a bit. You should get a sound similar to that you hear at the Dentist office when that suction thing suddenly finds saliva. You may also use the left side if your right side gets tired.

S – close your lips make the F position, suck and then open the right side several times. You should get a sort of stuttering sound.

U – make a ‘g’ sound, but swallow the sound instead of saying it.  This should sound somewhat like an ‘uhg.’

G – exhaling, make a guh guh guh sound. In this explanation, each G indicates one ‘guh’.

O – this indicates making the F position, but exhaling.

H – This indicates a throad clearing sound, like a gutteral frickative of, (for example) hebrew.)

P – make a ‘pop’ noise with your lips. Multiple ‘P’s means that many ‘pop’s

A hyphen ‘-‘ following a letter indicates stress on that sound. Simply double the length the sound is made.

Ex. FPPPBBR-USG = Leave the area imediately!

In written form, each repeated letter indicates a stop and beginning. During non repeated letters, just slide the tongue around to each position.

The language is idiomatic in the extreme. Each phrase is unique and any pattern seems to be by chance.

You can actually do this, why you’d want to, I don’t know.  Have Fun. The Eruithairk are our closest neighbors.